August In The Vegetable Garden

The busy busy starts this month.

Need to get finished preparing your planning beds, containers, seeds planted in flats or pots for transplanting FAST!

Most herbs can be planted now

Might try planting some Malabar spinach if you have a very warm protected area, or plant it in a container so that it can be moved to a warm/hot area later in the season

You can transplant fruit trees and bushes growing in containers into the ground  now

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Out in the garden you can start planting the following veggies

Warm Weather Plants 

  • Beans – Pole
  • Corn
  • Eggplant
  • Southern Peas
  • Peppers
  • Pumpkin
  • Summer Squash
  • Tomato (last of the month)
  • Winter Squash
  • Watermelon

Cool Weather Plants

  • Broccoli
  • Celery
  • Collards
  • Onion – Multiplier and Bunching
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July In The Vegetable Garden

Chances are your garden is looking pretty pitiful about now.  The lovely rain, heat, humidity combined with the slower pace has made everything grow… plants as well as bugs and disease organisms.

This isn’t a bad thing though.  It’s the end of our season and the timing is perfect.  It’s a signal that it’s time to start preparing for your fall and winter garden.  Seriously.

Fall planting starts in August.  There’s just enough time to get prepared for it.

Rip out everything that’s not healthy, growing well, and producing.

Add amendments to your soil to build it up – good stuff, organic matter… not chemicals.

Fluff that soil and keep it moist and let the microbes get to work making everything fertile.

Could try some solarization to kill off bad juju stuff in the soil (clear plastic on moist soil with the edges anchored down and left to ‘cook’ in the sun for 6 weeks or so)

I’m going to be trying the bacillus thuringiensis israelensis in my soil for nematodes (they’re baaaaack) (update… no nematodes evident where I’ve used Bti)

It’s time to be getting any seeds for plants you want in your fall/winter garden.  You will need to be starting them soon so that they will be just the right size for transplanting when the time comes – things like tomatoes and peppers and melons.

I’ve got LOTS of work to do out there and I knooooow you do too.  Remember to work early or late and stay hydrated and don’t get too much sun – try a wide brimmed hat.  The right hat looks lovely on you ladies and a Panama hat is oh so handsome on you gents.

 Cool Weather Plants

  • Absolutely NONE

Warm Weather Plants

  • Okra
  • Southern peas – black-eyed, crowder, purple hulled, yardlong (also called asparagus bean)
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Peanuts
  • Malabar and New Zealand spinach – which aren’t spinaches but are good substitutes in hot weather
  • Other miscellaneous TROPICAL fruits and vegetables that you may come across

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June in the Vegetable Garden

Summer ‘officially’ starts this month and so does the Hurricane Season… June is a month of waiting… waiting for it to reeeallly get hot, waiting to see if we’ll have any hurricanes, waiting for those afternoon thunderstorms and hoping they’re not too violent, waiting to harvest, waiting for your soil solarization to work, waiting for the right time to start seedlings for the fall garden (our second spring), waiting waiting waiting…

There isn’t much to plant this month so your time will be best spent doing maintenance and preparatory things like tool repair/sharpening, soil solarization, composting, building and preparing new beds, gathering the seeds that you want to plant in your fall garden…

Here is what you can plant while you wait

Cool Weather Plants

  • NONE

Warm Weather Plants

  • Okra
  • Southern Peas – black-eyed, yard long, crowder
  • Peanuts
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • New Zealand and Malabar Spinach (neither of which are really spinach)

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Memorial Day is more important to you as a gardener than you probably know

The men and women who have served in our military, fought to protect our freedom were fighting for your right to garden… a right that is not known world wide and a right that is rapidly being eroded even in our country.

Gardeners I’ve ‘pen-palled’ with in other countries tell stories of government control of their gardens.  Unbelievable stories… crazy stories… stories that could not possibly have happened here.

But… not so fast.

There are many places here in free USA where gardening is regulated or outright prohibited and illegal with hefty fines and punishments

- Can’t plant edible plants in your front yard

- Can’t plant more than a certain percent of your property in a garden

- Can’t plant within a specified number of feet of property lines

- Can’t grow plants over a certain height

- Can’t have a greenhouse

- Can’t water as needed

- Can’t collect rainwater

- Can’t make compost

Other garden/feed yourself regulations/laws/mandates that federal, state and municipal governments are trying to put in place include: — This is the short list…

- Mandated registering of your garden

- Mandated registering of seeds

- Illegal to save seeds

- Illegal to give away your produce (only those living in your household can eat your produce)

- Required to give a certain percentage of your produce to the government for distribution to those who are not growing a garden

- Requiring you to grow certain crops and certain amounts to give to the government for distribution

- Requiring you to only grow items on an approved list (which will have no heirloom or open pollinated veggies on it)

- Dictating the size of your garden

- Dictating where your garden will be

- Dictating the soil make up

- Dictating how and with what you will fertilize it

- Requiring gardens to be communal

- Taxing your garden

- ETC………….

A thing call Agenda 21 by the UN (United Nations) is the main force behind all this.  Many – if not most – communities have adopted Agenda 21 already

Those of you dear readers
who have served our country
and to your wives, husbands, children, mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters…
who also served by association

We remember and honor you this day for your duty and your sacrifice.

Thank you

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May In The Vegetable Garden

It’s here, the summer slump… technically it’s here anyway.  There may be a slump in what you can plant for the next few months, but there is absolutely no slump in what needs to be done in the garden.

Lots of other things are happening in the garden(s) too.  Lots of harvesting going on, egg laying by garden friendly creatures: lizards, birds, toads – usually the toads start singing after the first rain in May… this year they started singing with the last rain in April.

The heat and humidity starting in May is going to put a real damper on the garden.  It will be interfering with pollen viability which will lower production, and it creates an environment that bugs and disease totally love.  It is best if you do not work in your garden when it is wet because the chances of spreading disease goes waaaaaay up.

Be on the lookout for fungus… particularly powdery mildew!

Here’s the skimpy planting prospects for May (and June and July!)

Cool Weather Plants

NONE

Warm Weather Plants

  • Okra
  • Southern peas (includes black-eyed, yard long, crowder…)
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Malabar and New Zealand spinach (not really spinach but a good substitute)
  • Peanuts
  • Maybe squash
  • Maybe watermelon
  • Maybe mustard and turnip (for the greens) – After you pick them they will need to spend some time in the refrigerator or freezer to give them some sweetness and good flavor

Some advice:

  • Don’t work in the heat of the day
  • The high humidity is dangerous for you too because your body can’t use sweat evaporation to keep you cool
  • If parts of your garden are in shade part of the day, work in the shaded areas and then move with the shade (for example, my whole garden is in shade in the early morning.  Sun first appears at the west side then moves across the garden to the east side.  So, I start my gardening on the west side and then as the sun creeps in, I follow and stay in the shade as it moves over to the east side.
  • Stay hydrated
  • Wear a hat (some sun is very very good – vitamin D3 production – but too much should be avoided)
  • Use some bug repellant (something natural like citronella – get a little bottle of citronella essential oil from a health food store, put a couple of drops on the palm of your hand, rub your hands together, then rub your hands all over the exposed parts of your body – ankles, arms, neck, face, hair… works for me)
  • Take breaks
  • Get a hammock

 

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April In The Vegetable Garden

Another winterless year for most of us.  Plants are loving it… so are the bugs and diseases.  With no cold weather kill-off, seems like they are getting a major head start.  Spider mites, thrips, aphids, powdery mildew, early blight – just to mention a few – have made themselves at home for many weeks already.

Though we didn’t have much in the way of winter this year, temperatures are remaining cooler for a little longer than usual (translation – we’re not heating up so fast).  Because of that, you could probably pull from the “March In The Vegetable Garden” list a little bit into April.  April’s list is stingy

Cool Weather Plants

  • NONE

Warm Weather Plants

  • Beans – bush, pole, lima
  • Cantaloupes
  • Okra
  • Southern peas – crowder, black-eyed, yard long…
  • Sweet potatoes
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March in the Vegetable Garden

WOW! No winter at all this year, for the most of us…

plants are aaaaall confused.

March plantings are not much different from February’s, but the important thing is this:

March is the last big planting month for the spring season.

With April’s warmth, the number of things you can plant drops drastically and then in May, June, and July there are really very few things you can plant at all… you need to have the plants growing already.  Heat and humidity will affect plant growth and productivity – and so will the bugs and diseases!!

So here’s the list for March

Cool Weather Plants

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Collards
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard
  • Onion – multiplier, bunching
  • Peas
  • Radish
  • Turnip

Warm Weather Plants

  • Beans – bush, pole, lima
  • Cantaloups
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Eggplant
  • Okra
  • Southern peas
  • Peppers
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Summer Squash
  • Winter Squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelon

Remember though, this is just a generic list.  At your house in your gardening, things aren’t going to be generic.  Yours may be warmer, cooler, sunnier, shadier, dryer, moister, more fertile, different pH, more organic matter, yadda yadda yadda… than the average generic garden.

Look around your garden world.  Observe what and where things are growing, sprouting, the color, the health, moisture, disease… and use this information combined with a little common sense to guide your garden planting decisions.

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1654303_10202097628856440_59878130_nSorta says it all, huh

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February in the Vegetable Garden

WOW!  Looks like we might have another winterless year (from about Orlando south anyway)… 2 in a row.

That’s good, but it’s bad.

Good because we get extra growth, don’t have cold damage dieback, soil flora and fauna grow faster building that good rich soil, planting season is extended, more time to enjoy the outdoors in our garden paradises…

Bad because no freeze means no killing off some of the bugs or at least slowing them down, and bad because it gives us a false sense of “Spring is here” so we plant and then get a frost or freeze that destroys our seedlings and transplants.  The fruit trees and bushes get confused and bloom when they shouldn’t, and there won’t be enough ‘chill hours’ that some fruits and berries need to produce or ripen fruit.  The greens don’t get that touch of frost/cold to make them sweet…

Regardless of whether we have any winter weather or not, there is a lot of planting to be done ind February.

This list is not carved in stone.  It is only the recommended list of the FL Extension Service — which means it’s general.  Your yard is not identical to their test plots.  Yours may be cooler, warmer, wetter, dryer, higher, lower, more sun, less sun, protected, exposed… and then there are the micro-climates all over the place. 

Experiment.  Chinese cabbage and spinach are not on the list for February, but I want to plant them.  So, I’ll find a spot in my yard that’s a little bit cooler and has a little less sun than the rest and plant some Chinese cabbage and spinach there.  If it works, GREAT!  If it doesn’t, nothing lost.  It’s worth the chance.

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Warm Weather Plants

  • Beans – bush, pole, lima
  • Cantaloupes
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Eggplant
  • Peppers
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Summer Squash
  • Winter Squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelon

Cool Weather Plants

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Collards
  • Endive/Escrole
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leek
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard
  • Onion – multiplier, bunching
  • Peas
  • Potatoes
  • Radish
  • Turnip
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Week by Week

It’s HEEEEeeeere!

Week by Week

You asked “What can I plant right now?”

The Month by Month chart you get when you sign up for the newsletter is a good start, but you need something more detailed… You need to know what to plant and do today!

Week by Week is it.

Each week you get a downloadable and printable (so you can carry it with you to use in the garden, then put it in a notebook for notes and a record) check sheet that lists:

  • Seeds to plant, where and how

  • Plants to plant, where and how

  • Container garden planting

  • Maintenance you should be doing

  • Garden related chores to tend to

  • Things to try

You also get  in-depth info on the how’s and why’s of what you’re doing

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