April in your vegetable garden

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Another near winterless year for most of us.  Plants are loving it… so are the bugs and diseases.  With no cold weather kill-off, seems like they are getting a major head start.  Spider mites, thrips, aphids, powdery mildew, early blight – just to mention a few – have made themselves at home for many weeks already.

We will be running a series on controlling pests and diseases in the newsletter this month… something you will definitely want so if you’ve not signed up for it yet, do so now! Put your name and e-mail in the form at the top of the right sidebar!

Though we didn’t have much in the way of winter this year, temperatures are dropping below the normal average frequently.  Because of that, you could experiment with pulling from the “March In The Vegetable Garden” list a little bit into April.  April’s list is stingy.

COOL WEATHER PLANTS

  • NONE

WARM WEATHER PLANTS

  • Beans – bush, pole, lima
  • Cantaloupes
  • Okra
  • Southern peas – crowder, black-eyed, yard long…
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Malabar spinach

March in Your Vegetable Garden

WOW! NO WINTER AT ALL THIS YEAR, FOR THE MOST OF US…

March plantings are not much different from February’s, but the important thing is this:

MARCH IS THE LAST BIG PLANTING MONTH FOR THE SPRING SEASON.

With April’s warmth, the number of things you can plant drops drastically and then in May, June, and July there are really very few things you can plant at all… you need to have the plants growing already.  Heat and humidity will affect plant growth and productivity – and so will the bugs and diseases!!

So here’s the list for March

COOL WEATHER PLANTS

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Collards
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard
  • Onion – multiplier, bunching
  • Peas
  • Radish
  • Turnip

WARM WEATHER PLANTS

  • Beans – bush, pole, lima
  • Cantaloups
  • Corn
  • Cucumbers
  • Eggplant
  • Okra
  • Southern peas
  • Peppers
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Pumpkin
  • Summer Squash
  • Winter Squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Watermelon

Remember though, this is just a generic list.  At your house in your gardening, things aren’t going to be generic.  Yours may be warmer, cooler, sunnier, shadier, dryer, moister, more fertile, different pH, more organic matter, yadda yadda yadda… than the average generic garden.

Look around your garden world.  Observe what and where things are growing, sprouting, the color, the health, moisture, disease… and use this information combined with a little common sense to guide your garden planting decisions.

Growing veggies, herbs and fruits in Zone 9